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【popular】在多语言下的意思、翻译、词源、用法、例句

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See also: populär

英语(English)

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

词源(Etymology)

Borrowed from Latin populāris, from populus (people) + -āris (-ar).

发音(Pronunciation)

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpɒpjʊlə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈpɑpjələɹ/

形容词(Adjective)

popular (comparative more popular, superlative most popular)

  1. Common among the general public; generally accepted. [from 15th c.]
    • 2007, Joe Queenan, The Guardian, 23 Aug 2007:
      Contrary to popular misconception, MacArthur Park is not the worst song ever written.
  2. (law) Concerning the people; public. [from 15th c.]
  3. Pertaining to or deriving from the people or general public. [from 16th c.]
    • 1594, Richard Hooker, Preface:
      At the coming of Calvin thither, the form of their civil regiment was popular, as it continueth at this day: neither king, nor duke, nor nobleman of any authority or power over them, but officers chosen by the people out of themselves, to order all things with public consent.
    • 2009, Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity, Penguin 2010, page 645:
      Luther in popular memory had become a saint, his picture capable of saving houses from burning down, if it was fixed to the parlour wall.
    • 2009, Graham Smith, The Guardian, letter, 27 May 2009:
      Jonathan Freedland brilliantly articulates the size and nature of the challenge and we must take his lead in setting out a radical agenda for a new republic based on the principle of popular sovereignty.
  4. (obsolete) Of low birth, not noble; vulgar, plebian. [16th-17th c.]
  5. Aimed at ordinary people, as opposed to specialists etc.; intended for general consumption. [from 16th c.]
    • 2009, ‘Meltdown’, The Economist, 8 Apr 2009:
      As a work of popular science it is exemplary: the focus may be the numbers, but most of the mathematical legwork is confined to the appendices and the accompanying commentary is amusing and witty, as well as informed.
  6. (obsolete) Cultivating the favour of the common people. [16th-18th c.]
    • 1712, Joseph Addison, Cato, A Tragedy
      Such popular humanity is treason.
  7. Liked by many people; generally pleasing, widely admired. [from 17th c.]
    • 2006, Edwin Black, chapter 2, in Internal Combustion:
      The popular late Middle Ages fictional character Robin Hood, dressed in green to symbolize the forest, dodged fines for forest offenses and stole from the rich to give to the poor. But his appeal was painfully real and embodied the struggle over wood.
    • 2011, The Observer, 2 Oct.:
      They might have split 24 years ago, but the Smiths remain as popular as ever, and not just among those who remember them first time around.
    • 2013 March 1, David S. Senchina, “Athletics and Herbal Supplements”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 2, page 134:
      Athletes' use of herbal supplements has skyrocketed in the past two decades. At the top of the list of popular herbs are echinacea and ginseng, whereas garlic, St. John's wort, soybean, ephedra and others are also surging in popularity or have been historically prevalent.
  8. Adapted to the means of the common people; cheap. [from 19th c.]

反义词(Antonyms)

衍生词(Derived terms)

翻译(Translations)

名词(Noun)

popular (plural populars)

  1. A person who is popular, especially at a school.
    • 2002, Stephen Tropiano, The Prime Time Closet: A History of Gays and Lesbians on TV, Hal Leonard Corporation (→ISBN):
      To pass time, Nicole (Tammy Lynn Michaels), the most vicious of the populars, decides they should play a little game. Earlier that day, in their feminist studies class, the women were discussing Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, a novel ...
  2. (chiefly in the plural) An inexpensive newspaper with wide circulation.
    • 1983, Jeremy Tunstall, The Media in Britain, Columbia University Press (→ISBN), page 75:
      Serious newspapers boomed; the populars became tabloid supplements to television, with the television schedules and related features increasingly the core of the newspaper.
  3. A member of the Populares
    • 1843, Thucydides, “The” History of the Grecian War, Translated by Thomas Hobbes, page 415:
      [...] when their ambassadors were come from Samos, and that they saw not only the populars, but also some others of their own party thought trusty before, to be now changed.

来源参考(References)

  • popular at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • popular in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • "popular" in Raymond Williams, Keywords (revised), 1983, Fontana Press, page 236.
  • popular in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • popular in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Catalan

词源(Etymology)

Borrowed from Latin popularis.

发音(Pronunciation)

形容词(Adjective)

popular (masculine and feminine plural populars)

  1. popular (of the common people)
  2. popular (well-known, well-liked)

衍生词(Derived terms)

关联词(Related terms)

查看更多(Further reading)


Chavacano

词源(Etymology)

Borrowed from Spanish popular (popular).

形容词(Adjective)

popular

  1. popular

Portuguese

词源1(Etymology 1)

Borrowed from Latin populāris.

发音(Pronunciation)

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˌpo.pu.ˈlaʁ/
  • Hyphenation: po‧pu‧lar

形容词(Adjective)

popular m or f (plural populares, comparable)

  1. popular (liked by many people)
    Esse sabor de sorvete é popular nessa região.
    This ice cream flavour is popular around these parts.
  2. popular (relating to the general public)
    Eles estudam a cultura popular.
    They study popular culture.
  3. popular (aimed at ordinary people)
    Um livro popular de programação.
    A popular programming book.
  4. (by extension) popular; affordable
    Moradia popular.
    Low-income housing.
    Synonym: barato
  5. (politics) democratic (involving the participation of the general public)
    Voto popular.
    Demotratic vote.
    Synonym: democrático
Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:popular.

关联词(Related terms)

名词(Noun)

popular m (plural populares)

  1. (formal) civilian (a person who is not working in the police or armed forces)
    Populares ajudaram a encontrar o fugitivo.
    Civilians helped find the fugitive.
    Synonym: civil

名词(Noun)

popular f (plural populares)

  1. cheap accommodation

词源2(Etymology 2)

发音(Pronunciation)

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˌpo.pu.ˈla(ʁ)/
  • Hyphenation: po‧pu‧lar

动词(Verb)

popular (first-person singular present indicative populo, past participle populado)

  1. (databases) to populate (to add initial data to [a database])
  2. (rare) Synonym of povoar

Romanian

词源(Etymology)

Borrowed from Latin popularis, French populaire.

发音(Pronunciation)

形容词(Adjective)

popular m or n (feminine singular populară, masculine plural populari, feminine and neuter plural populare)

  1. popular (of the people)
  2. popular (well-liked)

变化形式(Declension)

关联词(Related terms)


Spanish

词源(Etymology)

Borrowed from Latin populāris.

发音(Pronunciation)

  • IPA(key): /popuˈlaɾ/, [po.puˈlaɾ]
  • Hyphenation: po‧pu‧lar

形容词(Adjective)

popular (plural populares)

  1. popular
  2. (politics, Spain) Pertaining to PP (Partido Popular), a Spanish political party

衍生词(Derived terms)

关联词(Related terms)

名词(Noun)

popular m or f (plural populares)

  1. (politics, Spain) a member or supporter of PP (Partido Popular), a Spanish political party

查看更多(Further reading)


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