万维词典

【rout】在多语言下的意思、翻译、词源、用法、例句

See also: röut

英语(English)

词源1(Etymology 1)

The noun is derived from Middle English rout, route (group of people associated with one another, company; entourage, retinue; army; group of soldiers; group of pirates; large number of people, crowd; throng; group of disreputable people, mob; riot; group of animals; group of objects; proper condition or manner)[and other forms],[1] from Anglo-Norman route, rute, Middle French rote, route, Old French rote, route, rute (group of people, company; group of armed people; group of criminals; group of cattle) (modern French route (obsolete)), from Latin rupta (compare Late Latin ruta, rutta (group of marauders; riot; unlawful assembly)), the feminine of ruptus (broken; burst, ruptured), the perfect passive participle of rumpō (to break, burst, rupture, tear; to force open; (figurative) to annul; to destroy; to interrupt),[2] ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *Hrewp- (to break; to tear (up)). The English word is a doublet of route.

The verb is derived from Middle English routen (to assemble, congregate; of animals: to herd together; to regroup, make a stand against; to be riotous, to riot)[and other forms],[3] from rout, route (noun); see above.[4]

发音(Pronunciation)

名词(Noun)

rout (countable and uncountable, plural routs)

  1. (countable, obsolete) A group of people; a crowd, a throng, a troop; in particular (archaic), a group of people accompanying or travelling with someone.
    Synonyms: company, gathering
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene.[], London: [] [John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938, book II, canto VII, stanza 44, page 284:
      A route of people there aſſembled were, / Of euery ſort and nation vnder skye, [...]
    • 1691, [Anthony Wood], “Fasti Oxonienses”, in Athenæ Oxonienses. An Exact History of All the Writers and Bishops who have had Their Education in the Most Ancient and Famous University of Oxford from the Fifteenth Year of King Henry the Seventh, Dom. 1500, to the End of the Year 1690.[], volume I (Extending to the 16th Year of King Charles I. Dom. 1640), London: [] Tho[mas] Bennet[], OCLC 940079791, column 744:
      The Incorporations this year did moſtly conſiſt of Cantabrigians who had lately come to this University for preferment from the Viſitors, when the great rout of Royalliſts were by then made in this University.
  2. (countable, archaic) A group of animals, especially one which is lively or unruly, or made up of wild animals such as wolves; a flock, a herd, a pack.
  3. (countable) A group of disorganized things.
  4. (countable) A group of (often violent) criminals or gangsters; such people as a class; (more generally) a disorderly and tumultuous crowd, a mob; hence (archaic, preceded by the), the common people as a group, the rabble.
  5. (countable, dated) A fashionable assembly; a large evening party, a soirée.
    • 1783 May, “Domestic Occurrences. [Thursday 8.]”, in Sylvanus Urban [pseudonym; Edward Cave], editor, The Gentleman’s Magazine and Historical Chronicle, volume LIII, London: [] John Nichols, for D. Henry,[], and sold by E[lizabeth] Newbery,[], OCLC 192374019, page 444, column 2:
      The Ducheſs or Marlborough had one of the grandeſt routs that has been given for ſome time, almoſt the whole of the firſt people of rank and faſhion in England being preſent. This being a new birth to conviviality in Marlborough Houſe, and the firſt rout for theſe ſeven laſt years, it was uncommonly crouded.
    • 1799 January, “An Ode. The Invitation.”, in The Monthly Magazine, or British Register, volume VII, part I, number XLI, London: [] R[ichard] Phillips,[], OCLC 1013453163, page 43, column 1:
      Come then, ſweet ſpring's delights to taſte; / No longer, my Maria, waſte / Thoſe hours in routs and noiſe, [...]
    • 1826, Walter Savage Landor, “Conversation IV. Southey and Porson.”, in Imaginary Conversations of Literary Men and Statesmen, volume I, 2nd edition, London: Henry Colburn,[], OCLC 29861779, page 78:
      The ancients have always been opposed to them; just as, at routs and dances, elderly beauties to younger.
    • 1832 January, “The Premier and His Wife: A Story of the Great World”, in Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, volume XXXI, number CLXXXIX, Edinburgh: William Blackwood; London: T[homas] Cadell,[], OCLC 1781863, page 91, column 2:
      The envoys were not often compelled to forego the toilet for the desk, nor the beaux secretaires, to give up their lessons on the guitar for the drudgery of copying dispatches. A "protocol" would have scared the gentle state from its propriety; and the arrival of the Morning Post, once a week from London, with the account of routs in which they had not shared, and the anticipation of dinners and déjeûnés which they were never to enjoy, was the only pain which Diplomacy suffered to raise a ripple on the tranquil surface of its soul.
    • 1847 January – 1848 July, William Makepeace Thackeray, “Captain Dobbin Proceeds on His Canvass”, in Vanity Fair. A Novel without a Hero, London: Bradbury and Evans,[], published 1848, OCLC 3174108, page 194:
      By a little inquiry regarding his mother's engagements, he was pretty soon able to find out by whom of her ladyship's friends parties were given at that season; where he would be likely to meet Osborne's sisters; and, though he had that abhorrence of routs and evening parties which many sensible men, alas, entertain, he soon found one where the Miss Osbornes were to be present.
  6. (countable, archaic) A noisy disturbance; also, a disorderly argument or fight, a brawl; (uncountable) disturbance of the peace, commotion, tumult.
    • 1838, Richard Chenevix Trench, “A Walk in a Church-yard”, in Sabbation; Honor Neale; and Other Poems, London: Edward Moxon,[], OCLC 1167636932, stanza II, page 62:
      "Nay, child! it is not well," I said, / "Among the graves to shout; / To laugh and play among the dead, / And make this noisy rout."
  7. (countable, law, historical) An illegal assembly of people; specifically, three or more people who have come together intending to do something illegal, and who have taken steps towards this, regarded as more serious than an unlawful assembly but not as serious as a riot; the act of assembling in this manner.
衍生词(Derived terms)
翻译(Translations)

动词(Verb)

rout (third-person singular simple present routs, present participle routing, simple past and past participle routed)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To assemble in a crowd, whether orderly or disorderly; to collect in company.

词源2(Etymology 2)

The noun is derived from Middle French route (military defeat; retreat), from rout, archaic past participle of Middle French, Old French rompre (to break; to break up, disperse) (modern French rompre (to break, snap; to break up (with someone))),[5] from Latin rumpere, the present active infinitive of rumpō (to break, burst, rupture, tear; to force open; (figurative) to annul; to destroy; to interrupt); see further at etymology 1.

The verb is derived from the noun.[6]

发音(Pronunciation)

名词(Noun)

rout (plural routs)

  1. (originally military) The act of completely defeating an army or other enemy force, causing it to retreat in a disorganized manner; (by extension) in politics, sport, etc.: a convincing defeat; a thrashing, a trouncing.
    The rout of the enemy was complete.
    The visiting football team was put to rout.
    • 1718, Homer; [Alexander] Pope, transl., “Book XIII”, in The Iliad of Homer, volume IV, London: [] W[illiam] Bowyer, for Bernard Lintott[], OCLC 670734254, lines 390–393, page 21:
      From Thrace they fly, call'd to the dire Alarms / Of warring Phlegyans, and Emphyrian Arms; / Invok'd by both, relentleſs they diſpoſe / To theſe, glad Conqueſt, murd'rous Rout to thoſe.
    • 1899 Feb, Joseph Conrad, “The Heart of Darkness”, in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, page 211:
      His position had come to him - why? Perhaps because he was never ill... He had served three terms of three years out there... Because triumphant health in the general rout of constitutions is a kind of power in itself.
    • 2018 February 10, Phil McNulty, “Tottenham Hotspur 1 – 0 Arsenal”, in BBC Sport[1], archived from the original on 7 November 2020:
      It was only the outstanding [Petr] Cech that stood between Arsenal and a second-half rout as Spurs simply swamped their opponents after the break with a formidable display of power, pace and sheer intensity.
  2. (military, also figuratively) The retreat of an enemy force, etc., in this manner; also (archaic, rare), the army, enemy force, etc., so retreating.
    • 1609, Samuel Daniel, “The Fovrth Booke”, in The Civile Wares betweene the Howses of Lancaster and Yorke[], London: [] [Humphrey Lownes for] Simon Watersonne, OCLC 1181407776, stanza 56, page 101:
      [T]hy Army preſently, / (As if they could not ſtand, when thou wert downe) / Diſperſt in rout, betooke them all to flie: [...]
翻译(Translations)

动词(Verb)

rout (third-person singular simple present routs, present participle routing, simple past and past participle routed) (originally military)

  1. (transitive) To completely defeat and force into disorderly retreat (an enemy force, opponent in sport, etc.).
  2. (intransitive, archaic) To retreat from a confrontation in disorder.
    • 2005, Brian Todd Carey, “Warfare in the Ancient Near East: The Bronze and Early Iron Ages”, in Warfare in the Ancient World, Barnsley, South Yorkshire: Pen & Sword Military, published 2013, →ISBN, page 18:
      The Ra division broke in panic and fled up against the just-arriving Amon division, which as a result began to rout as well.

翻译(Translations)

词源3(Etymology 3)

The verb is derived from Middle English routen (to snore; to grunt, snort; to sleep; to dwell; to settle permanently),[and other forms], from Old English hrūtan (to snore; to make a noise),[7] from Proto-West Germanic *hrūtan (to snore), from Proto-Germanic *hrūtaną, *hreutaną (to snore), from *hruttōną (to snore; to roar), from Proto-Indo-European *ker-, *kor-, *kr- (to croak, crow), *krut- (to snore; to roar), probably ultimately imitative. The English word is cognate with Icelandic rjóta, hrjóta (to snore; to rattle, roar), rauta (to roar), Middle Dutch ruyten (to make a noise; to chatter, chirp), Middle High German rūssen, rūzen (to make a noise; to buzz; to rattle; to snore), Norwegian Nynorsk ruta (to make a loud noise; to roar, rumble), Swedish ryta (to bellow, roar; to scream or shout angrily).[8][9] Compare Old English rēotan, *hrēotan (to make a noise; to make a noise in grief, lament, wail; to shed tears, weep), from Proto-Germanic *reutaną; see further at etymology 4.[8]

The noun is derived from the verb. It is cognate with Southern Norwegian rut (loud noise, din, roar).[10]

发音(Pronunciation)

动词(Verb)

rout (third-person singular simple present routs, present participle routing, simple past and past participle routed)

  1. (intransitive, chiefly England, regional) To snore, especially loudly.
    • [1387–1400, Geoffrey Chaucer, “The Reues Tale”, in The Canterbury Tales, [Westminster: William Caxton, published 1478], OCLC 230972125; republished in [William Thynne], editor, The Workes of Geffray Chaucer Newlye Printed,[], [London]: [] [Richard Grafton for] Iohn Reynes[], 1542, OCLC 932884868, folio xvii, verso, column 2:
      This myller hath ſo wiſely bybbed ale / That as an horſe he ſnorteth in hys ſlepe / Ne of hys tayle behynde he toke no kepe / His wyfe bare to hym a bordon wel ſtrong / Men might hem here route a forlonge.
      This miller hath so wisely bibbed ale / That as an horse he snorteth in his sleep / Nor of his tail behind he took no keep / His wife bore to him a burden [phrase or theme recurring in a ballad or folk song at the end of each verse] well strong / Men might him hear rout [snore] a furlong.]
  2. (intransitive, chiefly England, regional) To make a noise; to bellow, to roar, to snort.
  3. (intransitive, Scotland, archaic) Especially of the sea, thunder, wind, etc.: to make a loud roaring noise; to howl, to roar, to rumble.
动词变化形式(Conjugation)
衍生词(Derived terms)
  • root (to cheer)
翻译(Translations)

名词(Noun)

rout (plural routs)

  1. (chiefly Scotland) A loud, resounding noise, especially one made by the sea, thunder, wind, etc.; a roar.
翻译(Translations)

词源4(Etymology 4)

The verb is derived from Middle English routen (to cry out, bellow, roar)[and other forms],[11] from Old Norse rauta (to roar), from Proto-Germanic *reutaną (to cry, wail), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *HrewdH- (to weep), probably imitative. The English word is cognate with Danish ryde (to low, moo), Latin rudere, rūdere (to bray; to cry), Lithuanian raudóti (to wail; to lament; to sob), Norwegian raute (to bellow; to low, moo), Old Church Slavonic рꙑдати (rydati, to wail, weep), Old High German riozan (to roar; to wail) (Middle High German riezen (to wail)), Old Norse rjóta (to roar), Old Swedish riuta, ryta (to howl, wail; to roar) (modern Swedish ruta, ryta (to howl; to roar) (regional)), Old Swedish röta (to bellow, roar) (modern Swedish rauta, råta, rota, röta (to bellow, roar) (regional)), Sanskrit रुद् (rud, to cry, wail, weep; to howl, roar; to bewail, deplore, lament).[12]

The noun is derived from the verb, or from a noun derived from Old Norse rauta (to roar) (see above).[13]

发音(Pronunciation)

动词(Verb)

rout (third-person singular simple present routs, present participle routing, simple past and past participle routed) (chiefly Northern England, Northern Ireland, Scotland)

  1. (transitive) Of a person: to say or shout (something) loudly.
  2. (intransitive) Of a person: to speak loudly; to bellow, roar, to shout.
  3. (intransitive) Of an animal, especially cattle: to low or moo loudly; to bellow.
翻译(Translations)

名词(Noun)

rout (plural routs) (chiefly Scotland)

  1. A lowing or mooing sound by an animal, especially cattle; a bellow, a moo.
  2. A loud shout; a bellow, a roar; also, an instance of loud and continued exclamation or shouting; a clamour, an outcry.
翻译(Translations)

Etymology 5

A variant of wrout,[14] itself a variant of wroot (to search or root in the ground) (obsolete), from Middle English wroten (to search or root in the ground; of a person: to dig earth; of a worm: to slither, wriggle; to corrode; of a worm: to irritate by biting the skin; to destroy (a fortification) by digging or mining)[and other forms] (whence root), from Old English wrōtan (to root up or rummage with the snout).[15] from Proto-Germanic *wrōtaną (to dig with the nose or snout, to root); further etymology uncertain, perhaps related to Proto-Indo-European *wréh₂ds (a root).

发音(Pronunciation)

动词(Verb)

rout (third-person singular simple present routs, present participle routing, simple past and past participle routed)

  1. (transitive) To dig or plough (earth or the ground); to till.
  2. (transitive) Usually followed by out or up: of a person: to search for and find (something); also (transitive) to completely empty or clear out (something).
  3. (transitive, chiefly US) Usually followed by from: to compel (someone) to leave a place; specifically (usually followed by out or up), to cause (someone) to get out of bed.
  4. (transitive, intransitive) Of an animal, especially a pig: to search (for something) in the ground with the snout; to root.
    • 1859, “The Merrie Days of England”, in The National Magazine, volume V, London: W. Kent & Co.[], OCLC 7183824, page 154, column 1:
      [L]et us try to realise a party of people arriving before daybreak, on a cold mizzly morning, at a sloppy piece of grassland, routed up by vagrant pigs, and poached into holes by horses out for their Sunday holiday, [...]
    • 1864 July, H. H. B., “The Herds of Great Britain”, in The Farmer’s Magazine, volume XXIV (Third Series; volume LVI overall), number 1, London: Rogerson and Tuxford,[], OCLC 911663817, chapter XLIV (The Butley Abbey, the Playford, and the Wherstead), page 6:
      Here was Christmas with some Shorthorns, a black sow of Black Diamond blood, and one of the very best of the day, busily routing by the brook side, and a two-year-old cross between a blood horse and a Suffolk mare.
  5. (transitive, intransitive) To use a gouge, router, or other tool to scoop out material (from a metallic, wooden, etc., surface), forming a groove or recess.
  6. (intransitive) Of a person: to search through belongings, a place, etc.; to rummage.
动词变化形式(Conjugation)
衍生词(Derived terms)
翻译(Translations)

Etymology 6

Possibly a variant of root (to dig or pull out by the roots; to abolish, exterminate, root out), from Middle English wroten; see further at etymology 5. Some recent uses are difficult to tell apart from rout (of an animal, especially a pig: to search (for something) in the ground with the snout; to search for and find (something)).[16]

发音(Pronunciation)

动词(Verb)

rout (third-person singular simple present routs, present participle routing, simple past and past participle routed)

  1. (transitive) Usually followed by out or up: to dig or pull up (a plant) by the roots; to extirpate, to uproot.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) Usually followed by out: to find and eradicate (something harmful or undesirable); to root out.
动词变化形式(Conjugation)
翻译(Translations)

Etymology 7

The verb is derived from Middle English routen (to move quickly, rush; of waters: to churn, surge; to drag, pull; to throw; to agitate, shake; to beat, strike;)[and other forms], from Old English hrūtan,[17] from or cognate with Old Norse hrjóta (to be flung; to fall; to fly), from Proto-Germanic *hrūtaną, *hreutaną (to fall; to fly; to move quickly); further etymology uncertain, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *kreu- (to fall, plunge; to rush; to topple). The English word is cognate with Middle High German rûzen (to move quickly, storm), and is also related to Old English hrēosan (to fall; to collapse; to rush).[18]

The noun is derived from Middle English rout, route (a blow; suffering, woe (?); a jerk, sharp pull)[and other forms], from routen; see above.[19]

发音(Pronunciation)

动词(Verb)

rout (third-person singular simple present routs, present participle routing, simple past and past participle routed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, chiefly Scotland, archaic) To beat or strike (someone or something); to assail (someone or something) with blows.
关联词(Related terms)

名词(Noun)

rout (plural routs)

  1. (chiefly Scotland, archaic) A violent movement; a heavy or stunning blow or stroke.

Etymology 8

A brant or brent goose (Branta bernicla), formerly known in Scotland as a rout.

Origin uncertain; either imitative of the bird’s call, or possibly from Icelandic hrota (brant; brent goose), also probably imitative though perhaps influenced by hrot (a snore; act of snoring), from hrjóta (to snore), from Old Norse hrjóta (to snore),[20] from Proto-Germanic *hrūtaną (to snore); see further at etymology 3.

名词(Noun)

rout (plural routs)

  1. (Scotland, obsolete) The brant or brent goose (Branta bernicla).
    Synonyms: brant goose, road-goose, rood goose, rot-goose

来源参考(References)

  1. ^ rǒut(e, n.(1)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  2. ^ Compare “rout, n.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2011; “rout1, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  3. ^ rǒuten, v.(7)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  4. ^ † rout, v.6”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2011.
  5. ^ “rout, n.6”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2011; “rout1, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  6. ^ rout, v.11”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2011; “rout1, v.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  7. ^ rǒuten, v.(2)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007 (compare route (snoring) which is derived from the verb; see “rǒute, n.(4)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007); “rǒuten, v.(3)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  8. 8.0 8.1 Compare “rout, v.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2011.
  9. ^ rout, v.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2011.
  10. ^ rout, n.4”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2011.
  11. ^ routen, v.(1)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  12. ^ Compare “rout, v.4”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2011.
  13. ^ rout, n.3”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2011.
  14. ^ rout, v.9”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2011; “rout2, v.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  15. ^ wrọ̄ten, v.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007; “wrout, v.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1928; “† wroot, v.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1928.
  16. ^ rout, v.10”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2011.
  17. ^ rǒuten, v.(4)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  18. ^ Compare “† rout, v.3”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2011.
  19. ^ rǒut(e, n.(3)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007; compare “† rout, n.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2011.
  20. ^ † rout, n.5”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2011.

查看更多(Further reading)

变位词(Anagrams)


Alemannic German

替代形式(Alternative forms)

词源(Etymology)

From Middle High German rōt (red, red-haired), from Old High German rōt (red, scarlet, purple-red, brown-red, yellow-red), from Proto-Germanic *raudaz. Cognate with German rot, Dutch rood, English red, West Frisian read, Danish rød.

形容词(Adjective)

rout

  1. (Carcoforo) red

来源参考(References)

  • “rout” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Luxembourgish

词源(Etymology)

From Old High German rōt, from Proto-Germanic *raudaz.

发音(Pronunciation)

形容词(Adjective)

rout (masculine rouden, neuter rout, comparative méi rout, superlative am routsten)

  1. red

变化形式(Declension)

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

查看更多(See also)

Colors in Luxembourgish · Faarwen (layout · text)
     wäiss      gro      schwaarz
             rout              orange; brong              giel
                          gréng             
                          himmelblo              blo
             violett; indigo              magenta; mof              rosa

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